Bullpen & More, by Kevin Nelson

Archive for the ‘Autographs’ Category

“Masterminds” Episode on Operation Bullpen Now on Youtube

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BY KEVIN NELSON In 2006 the “Masterminds” TV series produced an episode on the Operation Bullpen case that you can now watch on Youtube. Well, excerpts from it anyhow. The excerpts were posted by a guy named “JoeMLM,” whose purpose is to call attention to the ongoing problem of forgeries in the memorabilia trade.

Some of you may have seen the original program, but if you haven’t, this might be worth a look. The “Masterminds” docu-drama is entitled “Foul Ball”—the FBI’s code name for its investigation into Michael Jordan forgeries in Chicago, which was then followed by the Operation Bullpen investigation. It aired for the first time in December five years ago, right after my book on Bullpen came out.

There’s a homemade quality to the posting on Youtube. It’s been trimmed and it’s choppy, and the actual “Masterminds” program that was broadcast around the country is far superior to what you will see here. On Youtube it begins with JoeMLM talking off-camera—apparently he wishes to keep his identity secret, thus he does not show his face—and he makes comments here and there, so be patient. The episode gets going after about a minute or so.

It includes an on-camera interview with Wayne Bray, the “mastermind” of the $100 million Operation Bullpen rip-off, and recreates some of the things he did by using an actor who plays him. An actor also plays Greg Marino, the chief forger. Appearing as themselves in the program are FBI agents Tim Fitzsimmons and John Ferreira, and Justice Department attorney Phil Halprin, all of whom played key roles in bringing down the ring in the celebrated 1999 nationwide bust.

Since I interviewed all these men, including Bray (and Marino and others involved in the conspiracy), “Masterminds” wanted me to talk about the case, which I did. They shot the interview in a hotel room in San Diego. I flew down from my home in the Bay Area, talked to them for about an hour, and flew back the next day.

The show first aired on Court TV, which has since become TruTV. The production company, Red Apple Entertainment of Toronto, may no longer exist. The program was repeated on TruTV, then syndicated on other networks and channels across North America. I suppose it was inevitable that sort of a bootleg version of it would pop up on Youtube.

One quibble: Both “Masterminds” and JoeMLM say that Jim DiMaggio—the man who “authenticated” the hundreds of thousands of forgeries produced by Bray and Marino—was a relative of Joe DiMaggio, the late Yankee great. Not true. Like so many other things having to do with the Bullpen conspiracy, that story was made up, a fraud to deceive the public. Jim DiMaggio has as much to do with Joe DiMaggio as I do with Admiral Horatio Hornblower Nelson.

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You’re welcome!

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Dear Mr. Nelson:

I just wanted to send a quick email thanking you for the great book you wrote on Operation Bullpen. I am a keen autograph collector and bought the book as I did my university dissertation on counterfeit autographs and how widespread the problem is. Your book was invaluable to me and I thank you for your great work.

Alex Ford

Cardiff, Wales, UK.

Written by Kevin Nelson

November 17, 2010 at 6:24 pm

Instant Reaction to ‘Monsters’ Article

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BY KEVIN NELSON Oct. 13, 2010 One of the great things about the Internet is that you can get instantaneous feedback on your writing. So it is with Monsters Behind The Door, my piece on the anonymous threats and bullying used by forgers and counterfeiters that went up on Autograph Magazine’s site just a couple of days ago. Here are two emails I’ve received on it already:

Nice job, Kevin. As you know, the stupidity and sometimes the threats come with the turf when you’re trying to reveal the truth.

And this longer letter, from Travis Roste of JoeHeavyweight.com:

Nice article. It’s obvious that the people who are willing participants in forgeries or the selling of forgeries are the ones who are harassing people like Chris Williams. I defend Chris in his videos, and then they start in on me. Some of the people selling the forgeries aren’t the forgers themselves, but they sell them because they think they are knowledgeable themselves, and they know just enough to be dangerous. There is a guy on eBay who sells fake 500 home run balls and other fake stuff because he believes that the cheap stuff he buys there is real. So when he flips it, he doesn’t have any problem selling a fake because it COULD be real.

This guy just sold a signed Roy Campanella bat for $166 when a real Campanella signed bat would go for a couple thousand or more. Campanella had a car accident in 1958 and any bats he would have signed would have been pre-accident, since his post-accident signature is a shaky scrawl at best. So this goof sold the bat for $166, and when I questioned him as to how Campanella could have signed this bat before 1958 when it’s signed in Sharpie and Sharpies didn’t come out until 1965, he defended himself by saying it was signed in Magic Marker, the predecessor to Sharpie which was invented in 1952. I countered by saying where the heck are the Ty Cobb signed photos and bats signed in Magic Marker since Cobb lived until 1961?

When Magic Marker was invented, it was a glass bottle with ink inside, with a wool wick. Of course it would have made a pretty wide and sloppy signature on a bat, not a nice dark defined signature that was on this bat, but this fellow doesn’t let the facts stand in the way of a good story.

And so it goes with most of the people who sell bad stuff on eBay, including those who may possibly not be aware that they’re peddling a forgery. They only care, as Roste says, “that they sell higher than they buy,” and they’re not going to let anything stand in the way of that.

Kevin Nelson is the author of Operation Bullpen: The Inside Story of the Biggest Forgery Scam in American History, now being developed into a movie.

Written by Kevin Nelson

October 13, 2010 at 7:08 pm

The Paul Revere of Forgeries

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BY KEVIN NELSON Sept. 23,2010 I know what motivates forgers, counterfeit distributors, and crooked authenticators: money. And ego, of course. But mainly money, lots of easy money.

But what motivates the people who try to expose the forgers? I was thinking about this while watching Chris Williams’s latest Youtube video on the rash of Mickey Mantle forgeries now flooding eBay. I have written about Williams in the past, and frequently exchange emails with him, and I continue to be amazed by the passion he brings to his fight to clean up the hobby.

The forgers also have lots of passion—making money will do that for you. But Williams doesn’t make money when he posts on Youtube as tomtresh2; he’s doing it because he loves collecting, loves autographs of the genuine kind, and positively hates the crooks and scam artists who peddle bad stuff to the many apparently clueless eBay buyers and sellers.

Williams has been at this for years—shining a light on the hobby’s shadiest operators despite threats and insults from them. Yet many of these operators remain in business and if they are no longer in business, others who are equally shady and corrupt have taken their place. Williams is a Paul Revere of the autography hobby, warning us about the scoundrels in our midst, and he deserves to be heard.

Kevin Nelson, author of Operation Bullpen: The Inside Story of the Biggest Forgery Scam in American History, blogs at www.operationbullpen.com.

Written by Kevin Nelson

September 23, 2010 at 6:47 pm

HBO Program on Forgeries on Youtube

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BY KEVIN NELSON Sept. 3, 2010 Anyone who is interested in forgeries and fake memorabilia—and that means virtually all collectors—needs to go right now to YouTube and watch the famous HBO “Real Sports” program on Operation Bullpen and the crooked authentication racket. I wrote a book on the case and I had never seen this program until today.

Apparently it was on Youtube for a while, and then it was taken down. My guess is that the reason for this was the $5 million 2008 Donald Frangipani lawsuit against HBO that claimed the cable network defamed him in its coverage. A judge dismissed the case in March, and now the video is back on.

Frangipani, one of the dubious “experts” who authenticated thousands of fake pieces in the $100 million Bullpen ring, makes an appearance in the program. In a sting set up by the journalists, he is shown giving his stamp of approval to several pieces of fake memorabilia. Other real-life characters in the Operation Bullpen saga also appear, notably the forger Greg Marino, who is shown in FBI undercover video, and FBI Special Agent Tim Fitzsimmons, who oversaw the three-year federal investigation that brought down the ring.

Even Dan Marino—one of the countless superstars forged by Greg Marino (no relation)—comes on camera to explain that yes, virtually all the signed Dan Marino items being sold on the Internet are bogus. The key player in the program is a man whose face is cloaked in shadow and is identified only as “Eddie,” in order to protect his identity. It’s no secret that Eddie is Shelly Jaffe, a counterfeit memorabilia distributor who sold mountains of fake stuff in the ring, was busted by the FBI, and went to prison for six months for his crimes.

Jaffe is interviewed in his upstairs study in his southern California home. I know this because I have sat in that study myself, interviewing Jaffe, although he spoke on the record with me. Always a quotable fellow, he gets off some good lines, including this one referring to the remarkable gifts of Greg Marino, “If God had a signature, he probably could’ve done that too.”

“Forger’s Paradise,” produced by Joe Perskie and Andrew Bennett and edited by Tres Driscoll, with reporting by Armen Keteyian, is an extraordinary piece of television journalism. Must-see for every collector and everyone in the collecting industry.

Operation Bullpen Keeps Making News

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BY KEVIN NELSON I continue to be amazed—and flattered—by the attention that my book, Operation Bullpen: The Inside Story of the Biggest Forgery Scam in American History, continues to receive nearly four years after publication. In an interview this month in Collectors Weekly, Sotheby’s consultant and Antiques Roadshow appraiser Leila Dunbar says:

There’s a book about the FBI’s Operation Bullpen, which, in 1999-2000, broke up a ring of forgers across the United States. They estimate that $100 million worth of fake autographs got into the market, and were distributed by all the big sellers. Forged signatures included Ruth, Gehrig, Cobb, DiMaggio, and Mantle.

That book was Operation Bullpen, and as I keep writing articles and blogs about forgery for Autograph and other sites and publications—in fact I’ve got a long piece coming out soon about literary forger Forest R. Smith, III—some in the collecting business have come to associate me with the FBI. Why, I’m not entirely sure. I got firsthand accounts and interviews from both the crooks and the FBI in Operation Bullpen; that’s what makes the book so unusual—the story is told from both sides (and fairly too. Both the forgers and law enforcement have praised it as a balanced, accurate account of the crimes.)

Nevertheless, the other day I was doing a story about a collector and I wanted to talk to the dealer who was planning to represent him when he put his collectibles up for auction. The dealer, at first, was a little wary about talking to me because he wondered, mistakenly, if I was involved with the FBI.

Believe me, folks, I’m a writer. And a journalist. If I were in the FBI I’d be getting paid a lot more. And I’d have to wear a suit and tie every day to go to work. But I’m not. I’m just a guy who wrote a book about forgery—here, check out my author’s website if you want to learn more.

Honestly, I figured I’d write Operation Bullpen and then move onto other books and topics, which I have. But I keep writing about forgery and other types of collector crime because it remains an endlessly fascinating subject, with breaking new developments all the time. The dealer eventually relaxed, we had our interview, and I filed the article with the magazine that assigned me to do it.

That’s the way it works in the writing biz—nothing more to it than that. But a writer lives and dies by his sources, and if you’ve got a question or tip about forgery or collecting crimes, drop me a line. I’m interested.

Written by Kevin Nelson

August 23, 2010 at 7:22 pm

‘Champions Forever’ sigs: Real or fake?

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By KEVIN NELSON Boxing fans have read and enjoyed Operation Bullpen: The Inside Story of the Biggest Forgery Ring in American History, and I know this because I get emails from them. Here’s the latest one, which popped into my email box at KevinNelsonWriter.com just the other day:

“Hi, I have been fascinated by your book. I am inquiring about the poster, “Champions Forever,” signed by five boxing greats. I was offered this signed print and wondered about the likelihood of it being genuine or fake? Kind regards [Name withheld by request].”

The boxing greats (seen above in the signed poster) are, clockwise from bottom right:  Muhammad Ali, Joe Frazier, Ken Norton, George Foreman, and Larry Holmes. All of them were, at one time or another, heavyweight boxing champions of the world. Lots of these posters are available online, and when I clicked over to eBay as research for this post, at least one copy signed by all five men was up for auction.

The last chapters of Operation Bullpen focus on the John Olson-Chuck Wepner counterfeit scheme in which Olson forged Muhammad Ali autographs on a variety of Ali merchandise, including photographs of Ali and Wepner, the now-retired, working class New Jersey pug who battled Ali in a memorable 1975 brawl that may or may not have been the inspiration for the first “Rocky” movie. (Wepner claims it was; Sly Stallone says he created the character from lots of sources.) In any case, Wepner sold forgeries in partnership with Olson, and in 2002 the FBI busted them both. Each received probation for their crimes.

One of the most popular items they scammed people with was the “Champions Forever” poster, which was based on a 1989 video of the same name. Olson, who became a master Ali forger and whose phony Ali sigs are still being sold today as authentic (one of his fakes is below), forged all five of the boxers onto stacks of posters that he printed (he was also a printer, by trade). Then, with Wepner serving as front man and capitalizing on his own real-life boxing cred, they sold hundreds and hundreds of them and made wads of money. When he saw the posters Larry Holmes’s manager said his client’s signature was a clear fake, and Ali’s people were so certain that Wepner was peddling fakes they contacted the FBI to see if they could help bring him down.

So, are the autographs on this “Champions Forever” poster fake or genuine? Well, I’m not an autograph expert and cannot say for certain. But I think you can guess from my response what my opinion is.

Kevin Nelson’s latest writing on forgery, Husband, Father, Forger: The True Story of a Bookselling Scam and How It Saved—and Nearly Ruined—One Man’s Life, will be released this fall.

Written by Kevin Nelson

July 27, 2010 at 6:23 pm